Posted in Daily life

A touch of home

For everyone in the western world, Christmas is fast approaching. Well, almost everyone. Because for the Dutch, especially the kids, there is something much more important coming up first: Sinterklaas!

Two weeks ago today, Sint arrived in Meppel in the Netherlands, to kick off the yearly three weeks of pre-sinterklaasfeest party. This is the time in the Netherlands when the little ones put their shoes in front of the door, in hopes of getting some pepernoten, chocolate letters are on sale everywhere and you cannot go into town without hearing Sinterklaas Kapunzje at least five times.

If you don’t believe me, go visit the Netherlands during this time! There is even a daily TV newsprogram on public television (the Sinterklaasjournaal) bringing news on the preparation for pakjesavond.

I thought we had left all this behind us when we moved here. But I was mistaken.

Through the teacher at the Dutch school that the kids go to, Willemijn got her hands on some tickets for a Sinterklaasfeest at the local Dutch club. And so, today, we made our way to Carnegie to see whether Sint had made it all the way down to Australia on time.

The Abel Tasman Dutch Club, or Dutchie, was playing host for Sint.
The Abel Tasman Dutch Club, or Dutchie, was playing host for Sint.
The stage was all decked out with a chair for Sint and a lot of presents.
The stage was all decked out with a chair for Sint and a lot of presents.

But before proceedings got under way, it was time for some proper Dutch food: frikandel speciaal (a fried stick made of minced meat) and patat (fries).

The menu was truly Dutch.
The menu was truly Dutch.
And in true Dutch style, you got to take a number when you ordered.
And in true Dutch style, you got to take a number when you ordered.
Frikandel speciaal. It did not quite taste like in the Netherlands, but I liked it.
Frikandel speciaal. It did not quite taste like in the Netherlands, but I liked it.

And then the big moment came: Sinterklaas made his appearance, together with his trusted Zwarte Pieten.

Contrary to what Sint wears in the Netherlands, here he is sporting sunglasses. Cool.
Contrary to what Sint wears in the Netherlands, here he is sporting short sleeves and sunglasses. Cool.
A room full of children was waiting for him, singing the old Dutch songs.
A room full of children was waiting for him, singing the old Dutch songs.

The proceedings were much like back in the Netherlands. The storyline was around the fact that the famous grote boek (the large book) had been transferred to an iPad and in order to get the password, the Zwarte Pieten, helped by the children, had to do a number of tasks. Fun, is a bit long.

Kai and Luka didn't want to join, but were drawn in non the less.
Kai and Luka didn’t want to join, but were drawn in non the less.

The whole thing lasted for about an hour and a half before we could collect the presents and head home. It was really a little taste of home for Willemijn and the kids.

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9 thoughts on “A touch of home

  1. Schade, dass wir hier kein Sinterklaas-Fernsehen haben. Dann könnten wir auch wirklich mitreden. Wir müssen noch bis Weihnachten warten. Liebe Grüße Opa und Marie-Dorothee

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  2. I like the idea of Zwarte Pieten. There was always just one in my childhood days 😀 Nice post. Interesting that there’s a Dutch club in Melbourne.

    Like

  3. Hoi Luca
    Fijn dat Sinterklaas ook bij jou is geweest. Hoe gaat het met je? Ben je al gewend? Ik ga je van de week een mailtje sturen.

    Groetjes van Jorian

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hoi Jorian,

      het gaat heel goed met mij. ik ben al gewend.ik vind het hier heeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeel leuk maar ik mis nederland ook heel erg, en julie ook natuurlijk.

      Groetjes Luka

      Like

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